Category: Competitive Intelligence

05 Dec 2018
Agent-based Shopping

The Rise of Agent-based Shopping

 

Retail is at a tipping point:

This was a main theme at GroceryShop’s inaugural event last month in Las Vegas. The event was attended by over 2,200 retail and CPG executives and was billed as the industry’s leading event for innovation.

Opinions about the tipping point were punctuated by Nielsen’s prediction: in 5-7 years, as many as 70% of U.S. consumers will regularly purchase consumer packaged goods online (“Digitally Engaged Food Shopper”). By 2022, they speculated consumers could spend $100 billion per year for online groceries (equal to $850/year/household).

For shoppers, digitization lowers barriers, making it easy to source product, compare buying options, find offers, transact, and take possession. For retailers, this means further downward pressure on price as competition evolves across more market segments than ever before: store, product, time, customer, channel, pickup and delivery options, cross-sell alliances, marketplaces and shopping apps.

 

Direct to consumer

Another big topic at the show was brands going Direct To Consumer (DTC) via Instacart, Amazon, and other platforms. For shoppers, it’s only getting easier as computers and AI get better at sourcing, comparing, and finding buying options that best meet a shopper’s current need. In this digital future, relevant offers will find a shopper based on her context (location, preferences, urgency, etc.). Margins will follow a retailer’s ability to make its assortment, offers, and delivery hyper-relevant to a shopper’s context.

 

Artificial Intelligence

Innovative retailers are leveraging AI to defend margins by segmenting markets better and by personalizing services and offers. In her talk, Google’s Laura Antonolli demonstrated Google’s AI-driven conversational assistant, in a machine-to-human interaction. Traditionally, a sales assistant’s role is to connect, understand, personalize and serve. In Laura’s demonstration, Google’s AI assistant searched for a hair salon, called to coordinate calendars for an appointment, and selected a haircut from an array of services.

 

Agent-based shopping

We are witnessing the rise of a new paradigm in retail – agent-based shopping. Laura said shopping agents and voice-activated search are a new battleground, stating that 22% of Google’s mobile search is voice. Forrester Research Analyst George Lawrie reported that “digital is no longer just a marketing channel, it’s now a sales channel.”

In one retail use-case, George shared that Alexa users spent, on average, £8 (eight British pounds) more per basket than at Morrisons. As of today, use cases for digital agents and household consumables are limited. That said, the promise ahead is for agents to create hyper-relevant offers and close sales based on an individual shopper’s context, values, and preferences.

 

Demand-side attributes

In large part, limitations come from the need to understand how shoppers compare substitutable product offerings and how those comparisons change under different pricing and offer scenarios. This applies to both within and beyond a retailer’s four walls. As an industry, we’re really good at supply-side product attribute data (i.e. weight, size & ordering info.). But we have yet to understand product attributes on the demand-side. Whether online or in-store, the old adage “price drives sales like no other factor” still holds true. From that perspective alone, comparability of pricing and offers within a category and across the marketplace are significant dimensions of demand-side attributes.

Comparability lies at the heart of understanding shopper values and preferences. As such, this represents a central value driver in any automated shopper feedback system. Without comparability information, offer personalization is largely blind to a shopper’s context, i.e., blind offers are not relevant.

 

Data takes a new turn

This brings me to a second take-away from the event. We are witnessing a fast acceleration in the variety of demand-side data elements offered by vendors in the space. At GroceryShop, these companies included: Engage3 (my company), Nielsen, Gladson, 1010data, EnterWorks, Label Insights and many more. Each of these companies offer unique data elements relating to different and new demand-side attributes.

As an example, Engage3 provides store-specific comparable pricing data. Nielsen provides measurement data aligned with many causal data elements. Label Insights provides detailed on-package attribute, ingredient and claim data. Data sharing and data feed integration between data vendors is also accelerating. These sharing and integration relationships open new paths to support the full promise of agent-based retailing.

Given the importance of product comparability, expect comparability to emerge as a primary focal point for integration. At Engage3, these sharing and integration relationships are beginning to yield new benefits, including:

  • More trustable competitive pricing and product comparability data
  • More precise methods for measuring price image
  • A broader and more frequent census of the competitive market
  • Deeper insights into strategic and tactical pricing dynamics
  • Improved automation and control over strategic pricing

All of this helps retailers automate and increase ROI from their pricing, offer generation, segmentation and personalization efforts.

In his talk, Earth Fare’s CEO, Frank Scorpiniti, spoke about AI as an “invisible advantage” that “removes repetition.” He reported that price promo and promo cadence all together yielded ROI of 300 basis points (3% of sales).” Adding “automation requires data quality” and that Engage3’s data has “near 100% accuracy.”

Getting data trustable is one step. Preparing integrated data for automation & advanced analytics is a step beyond. Supporting a client often means integrating a variety of data feeds from across a client organization with that of multiple data vendors. And building those feeds into a model is crucial so decisions can be automated in a controlled way.

Adding to the momentum, research dollars are beginning to flow as universities define research priorities in this space. One university we spoke with plans to create a center for excellence in food through the integration of personalized health, nutrition, and sustainability. Their effort would align both industry executives and academics from the business, engineering, supply chain, medicine & nutrition schools.

Agent-based shopping is set to emerge as a new battleground. Retailers that are positioned to make use of these new data feeds will climb the evolutionary path faster. Expect the industry to evolve rapidly in support of agent-based shopping.  It’s an amazing time to be in retail!

 

 

30 Nov 2018
Tariffs

Pricing in a Post-Tariff Market

Pricing in a Post-Tariff Market

As the markets closed on September 17th, the United States announced another round of tariffs against Chinese products. The tariffs, this time consisting of $200 billion worth of goods, were implemented on the 24th and will increase from 10% to 25% over the coming months. In return, China fired back with a list of 5,207 U.S. imports to be taxed, totaling $60 billion. National retailers like Walmart have responded by voicing concerns to US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and addressing potential costs to American consumers (CNN).

What started as a way of bolstering American business has become an all-out trade war between the two countries, with retailers in the crossfire. In such a situation, it can be difficult for affected retailers to implement new strategies quickly and effectively. Thankfully, with some insights into their competition and the national price leader, the most prepared retailers can come out on top.

 

Effects on Price Image

The prime question is this: who is going to pass on the cost to consumers first? Every retailer in the nation is waiting with bated breath for the answer. Private letters from Walmart and Target, among many others, have hinted at increased costs on the horizon, but there is no certainty of the first retailers to implement them (CNBC). The issue is that whoever passes the cost first hurts their price image the most. Items that were not hit by tariffs may still drop in sales because of the price adjustment, making the threat far greater than anticipated.

Still, this is only the beginning. The first retailer experiences the largest effects of the tariffs, but the next retailers to pass on the cost to consumers are also affected. This is where real-time competitive data can make a difference. Imagine that competing Store A raises the cost of a certain tinfoil to $8 in a market, and you are able to monitor that increase. From there, you can raise the price on that same product at your store to a lower price point than Store A. Though both products are affected by the tariff, your price image for tinfoil is maximized because 1) you were not the first in the market to raise the cost and 2) you are selling that product at a lower price than Store A.

 

Sliding Scale Tariffs

What makes these observations more crucial is the nature of the tariffs themselves. The increased cost for the latest affected products will go from 10% to 25% by January 1st, 2019, meaning that these small-scale retail battles will be happening on a weekly or even daily basis. Having up-to-date information on your competitors—both on a local and national scale—will translate to more victories.

The reality is that most retailers will face losses in the coming months because of tariffs, and stores hit especially hard by the increases have already taken steps to address them (USA Today). Accurate and timely competitive data can help to mitigate losses, especially when monitoring the national price leader. This is where store-level pricing is most important, because some price zones will be more heavily affected than others. Competitive data can inform a retailer when their competition is responding to tariff costs and how they can respond effectively. Implementing enterprise-level decisions in stores and going down to the local level can translate to a significant competitive edge in a post-tariff market.

 

A Watchful Eye

With the tariffs increasing to 25% by the end of the year, the market is racing to recover losses—the earlier a retailer can adopt a competitive strategy, the better. Because most retailers operate on low profit margins per item, an increase of even 10% on a product adds up quickly. In the case of a KVI, the increased cost to the retailer could negate any profit on that item, or even come at a loss. Figuring out a competitor’s pricing strategy and how often they update prices makes for valuable insights for decision-making.

At any point in the timeline, a strong price image is necessary to drive traffic to your stores. As we get further into the year, keeping an eye on the local effects of tariffs will be as important as pricing on a national level, and accurate competitive data can make all the difference. With the right insights, the tariffs present a unique opportunity for retailers in the coming months. Click here to learn more about Engage3’s automated price monitoring and register to receive information.

25 Oct 2018
KVI and Price Image

Known Value Items – Drivers of Price Image

A Shopper’s Store-switching Decision

A KVI is a known value item. It’s an item that disproportionally drives the price value perception. So, in a grocery store it would include eggs and an automotive store might include motor oil, and a convenience store it might include cigarettes.

The reason that KVIs are important is because they drive a shopper’s store switching decisions. If the retailer’s prices are out of alignment with the prices that shoppers remembered, then the shopper can reevaluate their decision to shop with that retailer.

A question you can ask a shopper is, what items do you stock up on? And at what price points do you stock up? And you’ll begin to understand what a KVI is with the answers you get to that question.

A Tiny Number of Items

Another element that’s really important with the known value items is that it’s a very tiny number of items that drive a retailer’s perception in the marketplace. Typically, about a third of the price perception comes from only two-and-a-half percent of the products. It’s a very concentrated number of items, and this holds true across grocery, drug, mass,convenience, pet, auto—virtually all retail sectors. So, getting it right is critical.

Dynamic KVIs

Traditionally, retailers will evaluate their KVIs once a year. Over time it’s gotten to a more periodic basis where they’re doing it more often, but the market’s changing faster today than it’s ever changed before. Things are getting localized, things are getting personalized, and with that the shopper’s price perceptions are being set more dynamically.

All of these things mean that calculating KVIs based at the enterprise level is the wrong way to do it. The analysis needs to come down to the store level, down to the shopper level, down to the daily level, and have items coming in and out of the KVI list at those lower levels.

Increased Complexity

The challenge is that all this results in a lot more complexity that needs to be managed. The comp shop programs that were easy for one person to manage before now explodes the amount of competitive data that’s needed and the amount of management time that’s required.

A Platform to Manage Margins and Price Image

The retail marketplace is only going to get more competitive, and retailers need a platform to support themselves in this new environment. At Engage3, we’re on a journey to build that platform to enable the retailer – the early adopters – to outpace their competition so they can outperform them in terms of Margin and Price Image.

17 May 2018
retailer

C&S Wholesale Grocers Partner with Engage3

On April 18 to 19, retailer C&S Wholesale Grocers held their 10thannual Tech West Expo at Thunder Valley Resort Casino in Lincoln, CA. Over 100 independent grocery retailers from the West Coast, including Hawaii and Texas, converged at the town Northeast of Sacramento.

Listed by Forbes as the tenth-largest privately held company in the United States, C&S Wholesale Grocers is a wholesale distributor of food and grocery store items with headquarters in Keene, NH.

C&S recently released their strategic retail pricing system and has chosen Engage3 as their partner for competitive retail pricing. “Engage3 IS the premiere partner in retail price information,” said Frank Puleo, VP of Retail Services at C&S.

Engage3 is a leading provider of solutions that help retailers and brands improve their pricing performance and compete more profitably through data science & analytics.

“We have worked with Engage3 for seven to eight years to deliver the best competitive pricing platform in one of our regions. Over the years, we’ve extended that partnership and now we have it on a national level,” noted Corey Quiring, Sr. Director of Corporate Retail Services at C&S.

15 May 2018
COO

Engage3 COO Edris Bemanian Talks Pricing Strategy, Pressures, and the Market

Last month, Robert Schaulis of Andnowuknow interviewed Engage3 COO Edris Bemanian on his observations of pricing pressures from the likes of Amazon and Lidl. “The biggest trend is that pricing and assortments are becoming more dynamic and localized,” Edris says.  He notes that e-commerce is now becoming a fundamental part of retailers’ strategies versus just a “me too” approach. Read the full article in Andnowuknow.com.

26 Mar 2018
MissionControl_Competitive Pricing Platform

What to Look for in a Competitive Pricing Platform

What to Look for in a Competitive Pricing Platform

Precise and Accurate Data

First and foremost, a competitive pricing platform must have the ability to collect precise and accurate pricing data. This allows retailers to target competitive shops, optimize frequency, and specify which items to focus on within regions or individual stores.

Rather than casting a wide net to see what useful data gets brought in, retailers must be able to get a global look at the actions of their competitors while also drilling down to store-specific opportunities. When they have both views, they can see clearly where they are winning and losing. Essentially, such a system puts both a telescope and a microscope into the hands of merchants and their pricing analysts, enabling them to comprehensively study their competitor’s universe. It allows them to reverse-engineer their competitor’s approach to pricing and to develop a targeted response, especially if they see a weakness.

Quality Assurance Workflow

Real-time_QA_Competive Data collection
A strong quality assurance workflow ensures that data being collected is accurate.

A competitive pricing platform must also have a strong quality assurance workflow. With today’s mobile app-enabled technology, automated processes can greatly reduce manual errors and ensure that only quality data is being captured at shelf edge. Additionally, such apps can compare shelf data against historical records, flagging any SKU pricing that seems historically unreasonable. Advanced analytics can assure that the data being captured is accurate in terms of price, brand, sizing, and product attributes. This technology can eliminate much of the human error that has plagued competitive shop programs.

Product Attributes

With the rise of private labels, competitive pricing platforms must be able to compare product attributes. In traditional competitive shop programs, as many as 40% of items go unaccounted for because there is no UPC match. To solve this problem, competitive pricing platforms must be able to utilize visual data capture technology and advanced character recognition to compare product attributes. This allows product linking to occur not just by UPC, but also by key attributes and statement of ingredient similarities, i.e. gluten-free and organic. This creates a more accurate picture of a competitor’s private label pricing strategy and their total value proposition.

Customized KVI Lists Based on Statistical Analysis

MissionControl_Competitive Pricing Platform
Dynamic KVI list support can help you customize by store.

Historically, cost and timeliness have made it difficult to acquire quality competitive data. Given the dynamic nature of the retail environment, static KVI lists are not responsive enough to the realities of where to focus competitive pricing efforts across various geographies and store-specific categories. The retailer needs a pricing platform that allows them to shift from static KVI lists to ones that are easily customized by banner or even by specific store. Rather than taking a blanket approach, the critical decisions of where, what and when to comp shop should be based on strategic statistical analysis.

Drill-Down Capabilities

Merchants need the ability to drill down and understand the decisions competitors are making within specific regions, designated market areas (DMAs), cities and individual stores across their overall pricing strategy or within specific merchandise categories. This would enable merchants to lead their competition by being right on pricing with the right items that are important to customers at a localized level. Such flexibility in designing and executing a more targeted approach to competitor pricing would allow for significant savings in budgeted dollars for competitive shops. A retailer could go after the data they actually need when they need it, rather than spending dollars on costly full book programs.  

Correlating Online and In-store Pricing

In today’s world of e-commerce, more and more retailers are taking an omni-channel approach to selling. A technology-enabled competitive pricing platform needs to take advantage of advanced web crawling algorithms to acquire this competitive data and correlate it against the data captured by auditors in physical store checks. This would enable a more efficient and cost-effective approach to acquiring competitive pricing data.

Aligning Objectives

As advanced analytics enable faster and more accurate decision-making, organizations will need to change to more cross-functionally aligned metrics that strategically drive the financial success of a company. When considering today’s retail organizational structure, is what drives a merchant’s decisions the same as what motivates the employees in a pricing department? Having the data to make decisions regarding competitive pricing at the speed of retail requires a major step forward in enabling accurate pricing decisions to be made with a sense of urgency and strategic intent. However, to fully unlock its true impact to P&L, the retailer will benefit from progressive thinking around how to align objectives and an incentive structure that motivates and drives collaboration. This will enable different departments with complementary skill sets to pull the rope in the same direction and drive a total value proposition focused on the customer.

 

10 Oct 2017
Thumb2

Engage3 Presents at Imperial Distributors’ Spring & Summer 2018 Seasonal Show

Imperial Distributors, a long time Engage3 customer & partner, is recognized throughout the Northeast, South Atlantic and Midwest states as a leader in both distribution and merchandising of supermarket non-foods. The Spring & Summer 2018 Seasonal show provided retailers with an opportunity to complement their food business with non-food offerings to drive sales & improve customer experience.

Ken Ouimet, Engage3 Founder & CEO, was a keynote speaker at Imperial Distributors’ seasonal show this year and discussed The Art & Science of Managing Your Price Image with attending merchandising & marketing executives.

Reach out to info@engage3.com to request information on the session and if you are interested in learning how to leverage competitive data and advanced analytics to compete more profitably.

Other presenters included Tom’s of Maine and Tebo Store Fixtures.
new-piktochart-_24497756
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Left to Right – (1) Ken, (2) Jack Wisniewski, Managing Director – Tebo and (3) Seamus Conlin, Food, Drug & Mass Agency Manager – Tom’s of Maine.
Left to Right – (1) Ken, (2) Jack Wisniewski, Managing Director – Tebo and (3) Seamus Conlin, Food, Drug & Mass Agency Manager – Tom’s of Maine.
28 Apr 2017
pricewar

“Surviving the Emerging Price War” Insights

Industry-expert and Chief Architect of Brick Meets Click, Bill Bishop, hosted a highly-anticipated webinar session with Engage3 CEO Ken Ouimet and COO Edris Bemanian. “Surviving the Emerging Price War” provides in-depth insights, tangible examples and tips and tricks on how to compete effectively in the face of a brutal and imminent price war among retailer powerhouses. The webinar supplies all of the key ingredients in making up a retailer’s survival toolkit.

“When elephants start to dance, mice get trampled.” Ouimet began the webinar with an analogy that accurately reflects the current state of affairs in the retail industry prior to highlighting Amazon, Aldi, Lidl, and Walmart’s price commitments in the emerging price war. As these giants begin investing in their pricing, the “mice” that are forced to follow but fail to react strategically remain in the elephants’ path.

Ouimet continues with a five-step plan on how to survive in the face of a price war and be met with some form of success or resilience. His ideas center around the notion that “the best offense is a good defense.”

Understand your customer’s perspective.

Using competitive intelligence data shouldn’t be the only tool retailers leverage. Retailers must identify which items are most important to their local customers and understand what items they are comparing against at their competitors’ stores. It’s essential to utilize accurate product linking practices to compare products in the way that customers do with attributes.

By understanding the way customers value their products and perceive the changes retailers make to their pricing, retailers will unlock opportunities to move their customers up the loyalty ladder. Engage3 is collaborating with customers to bridge sales, market share, customer survey, and competitive intelligence data to identify the items that are most relevant to their customers in each market and refine retailers’ KVI lists to reflect this.

Gain visibility into your local competition.

Slide0.JPG

If retailers don’t have visibility into local competition, then they simply can’t compete. Convenience stores have a high level of what Engage3 calls “localization” (geo-specific pricing), and drug stores have a lower level of localization. However, as a time-series analysis shows, localization scores have been increasing, and retailers like Safeway, Kroger, and Publix are developing higher levels of localization. Kroger, especially, has been met with a high level of success with localized assortments.

If competitors are not very localized, it provides an opportunity to strike hard and fast without any visibility. Engage3’s platform, in particular, takes price change frequency and competitor assortment localization into account when improving competitive intelligence programs over time.

Fly under the radar and attack where they aren’t looking.

Slide2.JPGOne suggested tactic could be moving away from larger competitive zones and instead into micro-zones. A regional grocery retailer that scores very highly with consumers in regard to their price reputation was able to maintain their positive reputation by leveraging their smaller zones to take advantage of their competitors’ blind spots through a mix of lower prices to earn price reputation points while taking higher margin on other items by allocating across zones. Engage3’s Competitor Strategy Analytics reverse-engineers retailers’ pricing and assortment strategies to identify margin opportunities and competitors’ price zones.

Strike hard and fast.

It’s not enough for retailers to Slide1.JPGattack from hidden angles, but they must also have an element of speed behind them. Amazon has a high price change frequency on several items found in conventional grocery stores, and the juggernaut’s price change algorithms are highly responsive. Retailers are taking notice of Amazon’s practices and efficient strategies and are beginning to follow suit.

Retailers need to minimize the time it takes to respond to margin opportunities or price reputation risks by getting data that is as fresh as possible to maintain visibility. Engage3 has helped customers identify when retailers can confidently leverage online data to provide a faster signal to increase visibility and proactively identify opportunities.

Reinvest benefits to defend your turf.

The environment of a price war is pressing and inevitable, so the first step to surviving is determining how to invest optimally in your respective markets by efficiently monitoring the local competition. Once retailers can establish a robust process in a program, they should be able to reinvest those savings to identify additional margin or price opportunities.

Personalization

The segment concluded with a last, but certainly important, strategic lever in fighting a price war: personalization. Ouimet believes that the future is personal and that personalization is unique in the way that it’s a highly desirable tool for consumers that also helps create a tighter relationship within retail communities. It provides more loyalty and more convenience for the consumer, and when applied to pricing, it becomes the ultimate segmentation and the most powerful means to “fly under the radar.”

The five-step plan is heavily reliant on updating competitive shop programs and price optimization strategies. According to Ouimet, those retailers seeking to constantly improve will be well prepared if there is a price war.

To register to watch the full webinar and find out more invaluable insights, click here.

17 Apr 2017
storebrand

Data Discoveries: Store Brand vs. National Brand

Milk: it does a body good, but what does it do to your finances? Conventional wisdom has it that prices always rise, and milk is one of the most consistently expensive items in its aisle – everyone needs it for something, from breakfast to baking, so of course the price of milk is going to go up over time, right?

Well, kind of. In the first round of our Store Brand vs. National Brand Analyses, we examined promotional and regular pricing trends for Organic and Conventional milk, and while a few of these analyses turned up what we might expect – regular price trends for conventional milk are both positive, with nationally branded items showing a significantly steeper increase over the past year than store brands — we found several surprising results as well.

SB vs. NB Milk

Let’s start with the major one: compared to store brands, the average price of nationally branded organic milk is plummeting, dropping by nearly a quarter per gallon over the past year. Store brand pricing has held steady at around $6.00 per gallon; but where nationally branded items once averaged close to $6.15, that average has fallen to $5.87 in the span of 14 months, now beating store brands. Promotional prices on organic milks are also dropping steadily, though store brands are outpacing national brands there.

The choice seems clear in one regard: if you’re an organic milk drinker, don’t just default to the store brand. It’s a good bet a gallon of Horizon might be easier on your wallet.

15 Mar 2017
ci-pic_172_88d08c2114a41bccb864711d4686c4f5b58873ac

Competitive Intelligence 101

The Sherlock Holmes of Retail

The phrase “competitive intelligence” is tossed around among competitive retailers and pricing strategists looking to grow revenue and expand their reach. Formally defined, competitive intelligence is the act of defining, gathering, analyzing and distributing intelligence about products, customers and competitors in order to make strategic decisions.

But what this really sounds like is a socially and legally acceptable form of spying. Companies that use competitive intelligence methods are putting on their black ski masks and waiting in stakeout vans with binoculars, ready to observe and analyze their competitors every movement.

This kind of “spying” is actually one of the oldest forms of ensuring market competition and drives the system of exchange that our livelihoods depend on. A basic study of economics tells us that markets are sustained by simple supply and demand models. When the demand for new Legend of Zelda video game increases, Nintendo is smart enough to increase their prices and the quantity that they supply to legions of insatiable gamers.

Profitable choices and strategic pricing is dependent on looking at external factors and the ecosystem of markets around you. Companies who want to thrive in a competitive environment know that they have to study two major areas: their customers and their competition. The two share a magnetic-like attraction, linking them together and linking the success of the company with their push and pull.

But to simplify things even more, let’s take a look at the classic lemonade stand example. Sally spends her summer vacations selling lemonade for 2 dollars a cup and expects about 15 sympathetic parents to visit her stand and buy a daily cup. When another lemonade stand opens up across the street, Sally notices her customers waning.

Infuriated, she grabs a recording device, her binoculars and heat-resistant trench coat and hovers around her competitor’s stand only to discover that the other lemonade stand sells lemonade for 75 cents a cup.

Now armed with this information, Sally can re-re-price her lemonade at 75 cents or less and make an informed and strategic move to stay the queen of lemonade sales.

Retailers like Sally want information about the prices that their competitors are charging, so they’ll be able to assess their own prices and make adjustments accordingly. By expanding the scope of our lemonade example to include the millions of industries and retailers with a diverse range of products and services, it’s safe to say that we’re getting a little closer to the heart of competitive intelligence as it exists in the real-world marketplace today.

The (C)ompetitive (I)ntelligence spy tool kit can be broken down into a strategic four-step method:

  1. Plan. Companies need to crack open their laptops and begin their Google stalking. In other words, retailers need to have a plan for what information they feel will benefit them. If retailers are asking the right questions, they’re asking about their competitor’s mission and history or their competitor’s target customers. They’re asking about which products are being priced at what cost and what special feature of that product attracts customers. They’re asking about promotions and advertisements.

 

  1. Collect Data. Retailers accumulate information by utilizing competitive intelligence programs or platforms. CI tools like MissionControl address the largest questions retailers might have about how to be successfully competitive with their pricing strategies and promotions. MissionControl is just one of the many innovative technologies out there that retailers are latching onto. There are hundreds of free and private programs that help companies analyze features of their competitors such as Quantcast, Knowledge360 or CIRADAR.

 

  1. Analyze the Data. Put your smartest and brightest to work extracting information that can be beneficial to understanding your own business in relation to the other markets. Alternatively, there are companies out there like Engage3 that collect the data and help set strategy with advanced analytics and insights. For Sally, it was figuring out that 75 cents would steal the neighborhood moms away from her stand.

 

  1. Make Changes. Implementing new pricing strategies, promotional programs or re-evaluating inventory are some of the many ways retailers then act on the data they’ve acquired. Sally quickly made the change and started pricing her lemonade at 50 cents. It worked like a charm.

 

Using competitive intelligence is like being the Sherlock Holmes of retail, and it is amongst one of the fastest growing business strategies of the 21st century. As long as there are Sally’s in the world competing against other lemonade stands, competitive intelligence will continue to play an important role in the social and economic foundations of the retail industry.